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Friday, April 20, 2018

Smartphone Addiction Tied to Loneliness, Depression

smartphone addiction
Smartphones have become a staple in today’s world, allowing us to stay connected and in-the-know 24/7 and helping us to better manage daily life. However, they’ve also created a constant need for phone time – whether you find yourself always refreshing your Facebook feed or responding immediately to every ding and vibration – and this can lead to a host of problems. 

For one, the endless stream of information and stimuli can wreak havoc on our ability to focus on one task at a time. Recently, researchers linked smartphone overuse to increased feelings of isolation and worsening of depression and anxiety symptoms – similar to the effects of other types of addiction. 

In fact, researchers from San Francisco State University likened smartphone addiction to opioid dependency: “The behavioral addiction of smartphone use begins forming neurological connections in the brain in ways similar to how opioid addiction is experienced by people taking Oxycontin for pain relief — gradually,” said Erik Peper, co-lead author of the study and professor of health education at the school, in statement.

The good news: Unlike drug addiction, we can train ourselves to be less addicted to our phones and computers, noted the researchers. They suggest the following common-sense tips to get started: 
  • Turn off push notifications.
  • Only respond to email and social media at specific times.
  • Schedule periods with no interruptions to focus on important tasks.
More About America’s Smartphone Addiction
Here are a few surprising findings from a survey conducted by Deloitte in 2017:
  • U.S. smartphone owners check their phones 47 times per day.
  • 80 percent check their phone after an hour of getting up/before going to sleep.
  • 85 percent use it while talking to friends and family.
  • 47 percent have made an effort to limit their phone use in the past. 
Complete Harmony CA Rehab
If compulsive cell phone use is a problem that co-occurs with your drug or alcohol addiction, Complete Harmony’s team of practitioners and addiction specialists can help. Join our family and begin to live life on healthier terms, without the need for technology overload. Call 866-930-4673 to inquire about our dual-diagnosis programs, or speak with a counselor about developing a customized recovery program for you or someone you love. 



Friday, April 13, 2018

Is Your Drinking Risky?

is your drinking risk?It’s a good question to ask – and it’s especially timely as we celebrate Alcohol Awareness Month, started by the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (NCADD) in 1987 to reduce stigma and spread awareness about alcohol, alcoholism and recovery. 

Drinking too much alcohol – at one time, too often, or both – can lead to a host of health troubles, including an increased risk of: 
  • Liver disease
  • Heart disease
  • Sleep disorders
  • Depression
  • Stroke
  • Bleeding from the stomach
  • Sexually transmitted infections from unsafe sex
  • Several types of cancer
  • Alcohol use disorder
The National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) “Rethinking Drinking” site offers several tools to help you identify any risky patterns along with tips on how to reduce your risks. 

Let’s start with the basics: What counts as a drink? According to NIH, a standard drink in the U.S. is any drink that contains 0.6 fluid ounces (14 grams) of “pure alcohol.” So this can include a 12-ounce beer, a 5-ounce glass of wine and a 1.5-fluid ounce shot of 80-proof distilled spirits. 

For women, “low risk” drinking is generally defined as having no more than three drinks on any day and no more than seven per week; for men, it’s no more than four drinks on any day and no more than 14 drinks per week. Only about 2 in 100 people in these “low risk” groups have an alcohol use disorder, according to the NIH. Women experience alcohol-related problems at lower drinking levels than men, which is why the numbers differ. 

Still “low risk” isn’t the same as “no risk,” notes NIH. This is because of factors like drinking too quickly as well as other health problems. For example, your best bet is to not drink at all if you are: 
  • Taking any medications that could interact with alcohol
  • Managing a chronic medical condition, like addiction or diabetes, that could be aggravated or made worse by drinking
  • Pregnant or trying to become pregnant
  • Under the age of 21
What’s more, if you can’t cut back or control your drinking and/or if your drinking causes distress or harm to your personal, professional, financial or social life, it’s time to take steps to get help. 

Help for Alcohol Addiction
If you or someone you love has an alcohol abuse problem, it’s important to know that you’re not alone. At Complete Harmony, we have helped hundreds of patients detox and restore their whole body using holistic therapies for symptom management and improved wellbeing. To learn more, call today: 866-930-4673.



Friday, April 6, 2018

How to Spring Clean Your Mental Habits

Spring is the season of growth and renewal and this goes for your emotional health, too. In fact, the next few months are the perfect time to purge yourself of any negative thoughts and emotions that could be interfering with your full recovery. Here are a few steps to clear the “mind weeds” and “plant the seeds” for healthier mental habits this season and beyond.
  • Identify your stressors. Stress is one of the leading causes of relapse, so there’s no better time than now to take action. Your first step is to figure out some sources of stress; try keeping a journal. Next, test out some relaxation techniques to calm anxiety and relieve tension. Some ideas: exercise, meditation, yoga, massage.
  •  Dig up a long-overdue apology. A heartfelt apology can help reduce guilt and internal discomfort and regrow a damaged relationship with a loved one.
  • Release your grip on a grudge. Along the same lines, forgiving yourself or someone else can help free up emotional energy so you can focus on more positive aspects of your life. Sure, it’s normal to experience emotions like anger and hurt, but allowing these feelings to fill up your heart will hurt you and your recovery.
  • Sweep away self-criticism. This will definitely take some practice, but you can do it. In fact, uttering phrases like “I can do this” or “I’m doing my best,” is a great first step. Another important part is making an effort to recognize that you will make mistakes and that it's okay as long as you learn from them and move onward and upward.
Continual Self-Growth at Complete Harmony
Our team of credentialed clinicians can help you explore your own recovery journey while learning to heal relationships and build a sober social network. For more information about our cutting edge treatments, call today: 866-930-4673.





Friday, March 30, 2018

5 Renewal Rituals for a Healthy Recovery


renewal rituals
Spring is the perfect time to begin thinking about how we can re-group, re-prioritize and renew ourselves so we can be our best selves during recovery. Here are some “renewal rituals” to help you get started.
  1. De-clutter your living space. Piles of unsorted bills or unorganized clothes can make you more stressed out. UCLA researchers found high cortisol (a stress hormone) levels in women with homes with a "high density of household objects." In other words, the more clutter, the more inner chaos. 
  2. Clear the mental clutter. In the spirit of renewal, why not rid yourself of negative emotions so there’s more room for positive growth. Make a conscious effort to find the positive side of things, give yourself permission to let go of any past mistakes and make an effort to re-acquaint yourself with the unique qualities that make you, well, you. 
  3. Start a daily spiritual practice. Spring is the perfect time to bring some more mindfulness to your life and to focus on your inner self. Some ideas: yoga, meditation, prayer, deep breathing or even mindful walking.
  4. Try something new. What better time than the season of new beginnings to try something you’ve always wanted to do – from learning a new language to trying a new fitness class to visiting a new city. A comprehensive recovery plan should include sober fun, creativity and any stress-lowering activities that can serve as a healthy escape.
  5. Make time for nature. Whether you decide to plant a vegetable or flower garden or take up hiking as a hobby, make a commitment this spring to make a connection to the earth by spending more time outdoors. 
Renewing Your Whole Self During Recovery
At Complete Harmony, we encourage the use of many different cutting-edge techniques to help clients heal the mind, body and spirit. To learn more about our treatment center and our approach to addiction recovery, call today: 866-930-4673.






Friday, March 23, 2018

Opioid Overdoses or Suicides?

In the midst of the opioid epidemic, suicide rates have hit a 30-year high – is there a connection?

This was the question posed in a recent NPR article titled “How Many Opioid Overdoses Are Suicidal?” And it’s not the first (or last time) this relationship will be examined. In fact, there are several studies linking drug addiction and suicide. 

One study of nearly 5 million veterans found that diagnoses of opioid use disorders (OUD) led to an increased risk of suicide for both males and females. And women were eight times more likely to be at risk for suicide; men faced a twofold risk. What’s more, researchers found the suicide rate among those with OUD was 86.9/100,000, compared to the already alarming rate of 14/100,000 in the general U.S. population, notes the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA).

Another study of 41,053 participants found that prescription opioid misuse was associated with anywhere between a 40 and 60 percent increased risk for thoughts of suicide, notes the NIDA. And those reporting at least weekly opioid misuse made suicide attempts at a rate 200 percent greater than those unaffected.

While researchers continue to study the link, there are still many unanswered questions. For instance, "no one has answered the chicken and egg [question]," Dr. Kiame Mahaniah, a family physician who runs the Lynn Community Health Center in Mass, told NPR. Is it that patients "have mental health issues that lead to addiction, or did a life of addiction then trigger mental health problems?"

For now, experts like Mahaniah say the best bet is to “provide treatment that covers all those bases." 

Do You Know the Warning Signs of Suicide?
The National Institute of Mental Health recommends seeking help as soon as possible if you or someone you know exhibits any of the following signs:
  • Threatening to hurt or kill oneself or talking about wanting to hurt or kill oneself
  • Looking for ways to kill oneself by seeking access to firearms, available pills, or other means
  • Talking or writing about death, dying, or suicide when these actions are out of the ordinary for the person
  • Feeling hopeless
  • Feeling rage or uncontrolled anger or seeking revenge
  • Acting reckless or engaging in risky activities - seemingly without thinking
  • Feeling trapped - like there's no way out
  • Increasing alcohol or drug use
  • Withdrawing from friends, family and society
  • Feeling anxious, agitated or unable to sleep or sleeping all the time
  • Experiencing dramatic mood changes
  • Seeing no reason for living or having no sense of purpose in life
Dual Diagnosis Treatment at Complete Harmony
When you're struggling with a mental illness and a substance use disorder, rehabilitation may seem like an impossible journey. Using traditional and holistic therapies, Complete Harmony has a proven history of successfully addressing a dual diagnosis. To learn more, call 866-930-4673




Friday, March 16, 2018

Study: Could Mindfulness Meditation Prevent Major Depression?

Mindfulness meditation prevent depression
By now you’re likely familiar with the fact that depression and addiction often go hand and hand – you or someone you love may even be suffering from both. But what if we told you that mindfulness mediation could help prevent major depression? Well, that’s what researchers set out to prove in a new study published in the Annals of Family Medicine. 

For the study, researchers selected 231 adults with subclinical depression, which is defined as the presence of depressive symptoms that are not yet severe or persistent enough to warrant a diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD), according to researchers. The study participants were split into two groups: The first group took part in a two-hour mindfulness mediation session once a week for 8 weeks; the second group received usual care. The patients were recruited from 16 outpatient clinics in Hong Kong. 

The results: The mindfulness meditation group showed fewer depressive symptoms – MDD was diagnosed in 10.8 percent compared to 26.8 percent in the usual care group. 

What Is Mindfulness Mediation and How Can it Help Your Recovery?
Mindful meditation is a psychological practice that helps us to be “fully present, aware of where we are and what we’re doing, and not overly reactive or overwhelmed by what’s going on around us,” according to Mindful.org. Another definition: It helps give us a necessary pause so we approach daily life with warmth and kindness – not judgment – toward ourselves and toward others. 

Being more mindful can certainly help your recovery. For one, it will prevent negative thoughts, feelings and emotions from distracting you or interfering with lasting sobriety. Here are a few more of the study-proven benefits: 
  • Better emotional control
  • Less anxiety 
  • Reduced anger and increased compassion
  • Greater self-awareness
  • Improved focus and impulse control
  • Deeper spiritual connection
Finding Holistic Treatment for You
At Complete Harmony, we encourage the use of many different cutting-edge techniques to help clients heal the mind, body and spirit, including mediation. To learn more about our treatment center and our approach to addiction recovery, call today: 866-930-4673.


Friday, March 9, 2018

Study: Smartphone Addiction — Hyper-social, Not Anti-social?

Are you constantly checking your phone, texting or scrolling through social media? Smartphone addiction has been in the news more and more, with many experts believing this type of behavior to be antisocial. New research, however, is looking at smartphone addiction in a new way – wondering if it’s a sign of being hyper-social?

In the new review, researchers believe the most addictive smartphone functions share a common theme: they tap into the human desire to connect with other people.

The desire to watch and monitor others — and also to be seen and monitored by others — runs deep in our evolutionary past, explained professor Samuel Veissière, a cognitive anthropol
ogist, in a statement. Social media is a way for us to find meaning, goals and a sense of identity.

“There is a lot of panic surrounding this topic,” said Veissière. “We’re trying to offer some good news and show that it is our desire for human interaction that is addictive and there are fairly simple solutions to deal with this.”

Still, the researchers agree that the pace and scale of hyper-connectivity can push the brain’s reward system to run on overdrive, leading to unhealthy addictions. 

So what are these "fairly simple solutions"? Experts says turning off push notifications and setting up appropriate times to check your phone can go a long way toward helping prevent smartphone addiction.  

And, above all, we need to “start having a conversation about the appropriate way to use smartphones,” noted Veissière. “Parents and teachers need to be made aware of how important this is.”

Complete Harmony CA Rehab
If compulsive cell phone use is a problem that co-occurs with your drug or alcohol addiction, Complete Harmony’s team of practitioners and addiction specialists can help. Join our family and begin to live life on healthier terms, without the need for technology overload. Dial 866-930-4673 to inquire about our dual-diagnosis programs, or speak with a counselor about developing a customized recovery program for your needs. 




















Friday, February 23, 2018

Chronic Drinking Linked to Dementia

A study of nearly one million adults in France found a link between chronic drinking and early-onset dementia.

Researchers, using data from the French National Hospital Discharge database, found that of the 57,000 cases of early-onset dementia (younger than 65), the majority (57%) were related to chronic heavy drinking. Alcohol use disorders were diagnosed in 16.5% of the men with dementia and 4% of the women with dementia — over twice as much as in those without dementia for both sexes, according to the study.

"Given the strength of the association, what is the most surprising to me is that alcohol use disorders had received so little interest in dementia research and public health policies," Dr. Michael Schwarzinger, a researcher at the Transitional Health Economics Network in Paris and a leading author of the study, told CNN.com.

According to the researchers, there are multiple ways heavy alcohol use can lead to dementia, including:
  • Ethanol and its byproduct acetaldehyde are known to have a toxic effect on the brain that can lead to long-term structural and functional brain damage.
  • Heavy alcohol use can lead to a condition called hepatic encephalopathy, characterized by a loss in brain function due to increases of ammonia in the blood caused by liver damage.
  • Heavy drinking often correlates with smoking habits and/or depression, also factors for dementia onset. 
People outside of France should take these findings seriously, too, Dr. Schwarzinger told CNN.com. “While the rate of alcohol use disorders is lower in the USA, it remains substantial enough to be considered a major risk factor for dementia onset."

Help for Alcohol Addiction
If you or someone you love has an alcohol abuse problem, know that you’re not alone. Our team has helped hundreds of patients detox and restore their whole body using holistic therapies for symptom management and improved wellbeing. To learn more, call today: 866-930-4673.



Friday, February 16, 2018

Few Depression Patients Seek Treatment

Here’s some depressing news: Only one-third of those newly diagnosed with depression follow through on doctor’s orders, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine

Using electronic health records, insurance claims and demographic data, the researchers studied nearly 250,000 patients who received a new diagnosis of depression in primary care settings in five large health care systems between 2010 and 2013. Only 35.7 percent initiated antidepressant medication or psychotherapy within 90 days of their diagnosis. The numbers were slightly more promising among those diagnosed with more severe forms of depression, with roughly about half starting treatment. 

Depression is a highly treatable condition, and it’s estimated that 16 million Americans experience at least one depressive episode per year.

What’s behind this non-compliance? The reasons ranged from stigma to challenges accessing behavioral health services, said Beth Waitzfelder, PhD, lead author and investigator of the study, in a statement.

And this is despite a growing effort nationwide to detect and begin treating depression during primary care visits. “Over the last decade, there has been a growing effort to raise awareness about mental health and to integrate mental health care into primary care,” said Dr. Waitzfelder. “This is a positive development, since most people receive care from primary care providers. However, our study shows there is a lot more work to do to understand why many depressed patients do not begin treatment.”

Depression and Addiction: Getting Help
A depression diagnosis may exist prior to substance abuse, or develop as a side effect of drug and alcohol dependency. When you're struggling with a mental illness and a substance use disorder, rehabilitation may seem like an impossible journey. Using traditional and holistic therapies, Complete Harmony has a proven history of successfully addressing a dual diagnosis. To learn more, call 866-930-4673.




Friday, February 9, 2018

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Disorders More Common Than Believed


More children than previously thought may have some type of disability caused by maternal drinking during pregnancy, according to a new study published in JAMA. Researchers suggest that 1.5 to 5 percent of U.S. children — up to five times previous estimates — have a fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. To put things in perspective, that's as common as autism, which impacts roughly 1.5 percent.

Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (also called FASDs) can range from moderate to severe and include cognitive, behavioral and physical difficulties, according to the Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention: 
  • Abnormal facial features, such as a smooth ridge between the nose and upper lip 
  • Small head size
  • Shorter-than-average height
  • Low body weight
  • Poor coordination
  • Hyperactive behavior
  • Difficulty with attention
  • Poor memory
  • Learning disabilities
  • Speech and language delays
  • Intellectual disability or low IQ
  • Poor reasoning and judgment skills
  • Sleep and sucking problems as a baby
  • Vision or hearing problems
  • Problems with the heart, kidneys, or bones
The study, funded by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, evaluated nearly 3,000 students as well as some of their mothers. More than a third of the children’s moms declined to answer questions about drinking during pregnancy.

“When you identify a kid with FASD, you’ve just identified a mom who drank during pregnancy and harmed her child,” Susan Astley, director of the Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Diagnostic and Prevention Network at the University of Washington, who was not involved in the study, told The New York Times.

Health authorities in the United States have pretty clear warnings when it comes to drinking during pregnancy: don’t do it. A 2015 American Academy of Pediatrics report said “no amount of alcohol intake should be considered safe” during any trimester. In 2016, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, advised sexually active women who are not using birth control to “not drink alcohol at all.”

Even a small amount of alcohol can seriously affect a baby, said Dr. Astley. “There’s probably no two women on the planet who drank the same amount on the same day of pregnancy. And alcohol doesn’t impact every fetus in the same way.”

The researchers hope that these findings will serve as a wake-up call for moms-to-be: “Alcohol can damage every system of the body,” Dr. Svetlana Popova, a senior scientist at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health’s Institute for Mental Health Policy Research in Toronto and a co-author of an editorial about the new study, told NYT. “We have to scream about this problem to the world.”

Getting Help for Alcohol Abuse
If you have a drinking problem and are pregnant or considering pregnancy, we can work together to create a plan to help you live a happy and alcohol-free lifestyle. To learn more about our holistic addiction program, call today: 866-930-4673.

Friday, February 2, 2018

Building a Healthy Heart After Substance Abuse

It’s Heart Health Month, held each year to remind Americans to learn about the impact the heart has on one’s overall health, as well as the lifestyle factors that can promote a healthy heart. 

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women, so it’s never too soon to start caring for this vital organ. Certainly getting help for drug or alcohol abuse is a great step. Both drugs and alcohol can pose very serious risks to your cardiovascular health, increasing your risk for heart attack and stroke. 

Here’s a look at how to best care for your ticker after years of abuse from addiction. Perhaps the best part, these tips from the American Heart Association (AHA) can work double-duty and benefit your overall recovery, too: 

Get active. If you get at least 30 minutes of moderate physical activity each day (like brisk walking), five times per week, you can almost guarantee yourself a healthier and more satisfying life while lowering your risks for heart disease, stroke and diabetes, according to AHA.

Watch your cholesterol. Too much bad cholesterol (LDL) can form plaque in your veins and arteries – and these blockages can lead to heart disease and stroke. Firstly, if you don’t know your numbers, schedule a visit with your doctor to get checked. If your numbers are high, engaging in moderate exercise, avoiding tobacco smoke and eating a heart-healthy diet can help.

Manage high blood pressure. High blood pressure, also known as hypertension, is a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke. Again, get your numbers checked and make an effort to follow these steps from the AHA:
  • Eat a heart-healthy diet, including reducing sodium
  • Get regular physical activity
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • Manage stress
  • Avoid tobacco smoke.
Pay attention to your diet. Healthy foods are the fuel our bodies use to create the energy we need to thrive and fight diseases, notes AHA. So do your best to load up on veggies, fruit, low-fat dairy, fiber-rich whole grains, and lean meats including fish.

Nutrition Planning at Complete Harmony
Helping clients plan healthful meals to enrich their body and mind is just one of the many features of our hybrid addiction treatment. By integrating conventional and holistic recovery approaches, we help restore balance to the whole person. To learn more, call: 866-930-4673.


Friday, January 26, 2018

5 Ways Yoga Helps Recovery

A regular yoga practice may not be for everyone – but everyone can give it a try. Here are five ways this ancient practice can help you on the road to recovery: 

1. You’ll feel calmer. Perhaps the most widely known benefit of yoga is its ability to reduce stress and anxiety, which can interfere with your recovery and even trigger relapse.

2. You’ll have greater self-awareness. Yoga can put you in a state of calm and focus so you can reflect on where you are and where you want to be in your recovery. It also teaches you to be more self-aware – but without judgment or reaction – and this can certainly help you better manage any negative feelings you’re having.

3. You’ll handle cravings better. Again, this greater self-awareness brought on by yoga can give you an edge when it comes to identifying and managing any drug or alcohol cravings. 

4. You’ll be in a better mood. The deep breathing exercises taught in yoga have been found to boost mood (lowering stress hormones) and lessen depressive symptoms. In fact, one study found that a specialized set of breathing exercises called Sudarshana Kriya Yoga (SKY) helped people during detox for alcohol dependence. SKY uses three types of seated breathing: victorious breath (a slow deep breathing), bellows breath (a forced inhalation and exhalation) for 12 to 15 minutes, and cyclical breathing of slow, medium and fast cycles for 30 minutes, according Psychology Today.

5. You’ll become more confident. Yoga challenges you mentally and physically and can help build confidence in your body and your ability to set and reach recovery goals. 

Making Yoga Part of Your Addiction Treatment
Stepping out of the confines of traditional rehab programs, Complete Harmony empowers clients to achieve and maintain sobriety through the use of holistic therapies and non-12-step alternative approaches. To learn more about our complementary therapy approaches, including yoga, call us today: 866-930-4673.




Thursday, January 18, 2018

Study Links Sleep Loss and Depression

Making sleep a priority is perhaps the best thing you can do to stop negative thinking and safeguard your mental health. In fact, a new study links chronic lack of sleep with an increased risk of depression. 

Researchers from Binghamton University says the connection is due to a phenomenon called repetitive negative thinking (RNT), which the study authors define as “abstract, perseverative, negative focus on one's problems and experiences that is difficult to control.” And an inability to suppress negative thoughts is a common symptom of both mood and anxiety disorders.

Study participants were asked to view negative images (guns, knives, threatening animals), positive images (nature, sports) or neutral ones (household items). It turned out that people who slept fewer hours looked at the negative images longer and had more trouble disengaging from them. 

While more research is needed, study authors say that a lack of sleep may deteriorate the neural processes that normally suppress or shed negative thoughts and negative incoming information.

“[The connection] may be explained by a reduction in available cognitive resources, particularly those needed to inhibit information and handle novel information,” the authors write in their paper. “It is possible that sleep disruption deals a ‘second hit’ to attention control in individuals who are already vulnerable in their subjective and/or physiological responses to negative information.”

Sleeping for Sobriety
Maintaining a proper sleep schedule can certainly go a long way toward helping your recovery. Here are a few reasons why:
  • You’ll have better emotional control.
  • You'll have increased energy and optimism. 
  • You’ll have more focus and better memory. 
  • You’ll have a stronger immune system. 
Are You Struggling With Depression and Addiction?
Co-occurring conditions like depression may exist prior to substance abuse, or develop as a side effect of drug and alcohol dependency. Using traditional and holistic therapies, Complete Harmony has a proven history of successfully addressing the secondary health challenges that complicate substance abuse. To learn more, call 866-930-4673.


Friday, January 12, 2018

Practicing Anti-Drug/Drink Activities

A big part of staying sober and avoiding relapse is gaining a sense of control over your cravings. To help switch your focus away from drugs or alcohol, addiction experts advise creating a list of “anti-drug” and/or “anti-drink” activities. These simple actions are meant to serve as healthy distractions and to fill your time by giving you positive things to do.

According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), the people who are most successful at staying sober do two anti-drugs/ drinks in particular: go to counseling and join a self-help group. 

Here are a few more suggestions from SAMHSA that might work for you:
  • Chew gum when you crave a drug or drink.
  • Call your self-help group sponsor or a friend instead of going to places where you might use. 
  • Watch movies.
  • Shoot some baskets with friends.
  • Read an inspirational book.
  • Keep pictures of your children in your pocket as motivation to stay away from alcohol and drugs. 
  • Join a faith organization that supports recovery. 
  • Find a volunteer position that keeps you busy and away from others who use. 
  • Pray or meditate.
  • Practice mindfulness.

Take this list of ideas and add a few of your own. The more anti-drugs/anti-drinks you have the better, notes SAMHSA. Consider brainstorming with your addiction counselor or peers to come up with activities that align with your personal interests and individual recovery goals. 

Relapse Prevention at Complete Harmony
To prevent relapse and ensure long-term sobriety, it’s crucial to have long-term strategies for dealing with physical and psychological cravings, negative patterns, emotional duress, poor self-esteem and more. Our holistic approach to recovery helps clients change behaviors from the inside out; rather than just putting a bandage on addictive tendencies. To learn more about our alternative relapse prevention program, call today: 866-930-4673.



Friday, January 5, 2018

How to Set New Year’s Intentions

Have you made resolutions in the past – or even this year – that have quickly fizzled, or worse, made you feel like a failure? If so, you may want to consider setting intentions; it’s not too late.

This is because intentions don’t tie you to a specific outcome – and there’s no timeline or deadline to meet – so you’ll eliminate any feelings of failure. In short, intentions simply require that you’re mindful and present as you go through your day, hour-to-hour. Intentions invite you to be your personal best and can serve as a map for your goals and visions.

“Intention is the starting point of every dream,” Deepak Chopra, MD, best-selling author, physician, and founder of the Chopra Center for Wellbeing in Carlsbad, CA, told MindBodyGreen.com. “It is the creative power that fulfills all of our needs, whether for money, relationships, spiritual awakening, or love.” 

Here are a few tips, adapted from the experts at MindBodyGreen.com, for setting an intention in the New Year: 

Tap into your inner voice. Take some quite time or even mediate and ask yourself: What gives you passion and fills you with a sense of purpose? 

Some examples: 
  • I intend to manifest happiness naturally.
  • I intend to respond first, and then react.
  • I intend to be open to success and abundance.
  • I intend to stop taking things personally.
  • I intend to forgive others, and myself.
  • I intend to love unconditionally.
  • I intend to make meditation a more important part of my lifestyle.
  • I intend to make someone smile every day.
Keep it positive. An intention should not be negative, nor should it be in the past or future tense. So, for example, if your intention is to de-stress, say something like: “My intention is to invite peace and calm within myself during today's meditation," note experts at MindBodyGreen.com. 

Hold yourself accountable. Many people, like blogger Jessica Hagy, say that it’s helpful to check in with yourself daily. “Every morning before I wake up, I place my hand on my heart for just a few seconds or a few moments, and I breathe, connect to myself, send love to myself, and send love to the day. Then I set an intention for my day,” she writes. 

Be grateful. Take a few moments to be grateful for the intention you have set. And don’t be afraid to adjust your intention after a few days. For example: If your intentions is "to invite peace and calm in,” you can change it "to enjoy the peace I create in myself.”

Finding Holistic Treatment for You
At Complete Harmony, we encourage the use of many different cutting-edge techniques to help clients heal the mind, body and spirit. To learn more about our treatment center and our approach to addiction recovery, call today: 866-930-4673.




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